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Social Context and Scale-Up Research

One strand of DRDC’s research was devoted to furthering understanding of how social context affects student learning. This research reinforced the notion that context determines how and when proven interventions might work with different student and teacher populations. DRDC-supported research in this area included investigations of the social forces that shape the contexts in which classroom-based interventions are enacted; explorations of the importance of controlling for key contextual variables; a discussion of social capital and education; the social and institutional contexts of teacher education; and how identity formation affects college aspirations. Related publications and presentations include:

  • Kim and Schneider (2005). Social capital in action: Alignment of parental support in adolescents' transition to postsecondary education, Social Forces, 84(2): 1181-1206.
  • Petrin, R. A. (2005). School organization, curricular structure, and the distribution and effects of instruction for tenth-grade science. In L. V. Hedges and B. Schneider (Eds.) The Social Organization of Schooling. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Yount, S. & Hoogstra, L. (2005). For love or money? Rethinking split-shift parenting. Paper presented at the 2005 Annual meeting of the American Sociological Association. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • McDonald, S-K., Keesler, V., Kauffman, N., & Schneider, B. (2006). Scaling-up exemplary interventions. Educational Researcher, 35(3): 15-24.
  • Bennett, K. (2007). Professional contexts of teaching and the success of an alternative teacher training intervention.Presented at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Chicago, Illinois.
  • Perez-Felkner, L. (2007). Capital transformations in a predominantly Latino school: A multi-method examination of a postsecondary preparatory intervention model. Presented at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Chicago, Illinois.
  • Santana, R. (2007). Conditions and contingencies: A multi-method examination of school composition and institutional attachment. Presented at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Chicago, Illinois.
  • Schneider, B., Ford, T., & Perez-Felkner, L. (in press). Social networks’ influence on children and youth. International Encyclopedia of Education. Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier.
  • McGhee Hassrick, E., & Schneider, B. (in press). Parent social networks: Securing a school advantage for their children. American Journal of Education.
  • Wyse, A.E., Keesler, V.A., & Schneider, B. (in press). Assessing the effects of small school size on mathematics and achievement: A propensity score-matching approach.  Teachers College Record.
 
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